People who suffer from dementia or Alzheimer’s disease may be at risk of abuse or neglect in a nursing home. They may be uncooperative or aggressive, thereby becoming a target of abuse. They are also more vulnerable because they may not be able to communicate abuse or neglect. You may be uncertain about how to find a safe and caring Illinois nursing home for a family member with memory loss. 

Because people with dementia often cannot advocate for themselves, it is crucial for family members to actively engage in the search for an appropriate long-term care facility with experience in memory care. You can ask several questions to help evaluate whether the home has a good environment for residents with memory loss: 

  • Do the facility’s administrators and leaders set the tone for a culture of excellent care and accountability? Are they accessible and willing to talk to family members about concerns, including abuse by staff members? Does the facility invite family participation in programs like family councils? 
  • Are staff members positive and patient with each other and with residents? Is the facility properly staffed, or are employees consistently overworked? 
  • Do caregivers receive comprehensive education and training designed to help them understand memory impairment? Are they trained to identify signs of neglect and abuse? 
  • Do employees and administrators listen to residents and their complaints? Does the facility have specific procedures for reporting and documenting complaints? 
  • What is the intake process for residents, and does the facility’s initial screening inform the resident’s care plan? What is the process for evaluating and refining the care plan? 

When you ask detailed questions and demand detailed answers, you gather information that can guide your decision about whether a particular nursing home is suitable for your memory-impaired family member.